Saul Becker
June 2014
Landscape: An Evolving Exploration of Place

Course Description
The perception of landscape in America has made many dramatic shifts throughout history, and yet landscape painting is often still seen as a genre rooted in the romantic lens of the mid-nineteenth century. This studio course will explore landscape in relation to contemporary life and all the stresses and uncertainties that go with living in a world where the post industrial landscape and global warming start to redefine our relationship with the natural world. In this course we will look at the evolution of landscape thinking both through examining past work and producing new work. We will look at historical artworks, read texts, and explore landscape through painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, and new media. Through this course we will examine landscape and the idea of place with an understanding that the natural world and our relationship with it is ever changing.
Participants of all skill levels are welcome and encouraged.

Artist's Biography

Saul Becker was born in Tacoma, Washington. He received a BFA from nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and an MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. He was the recipient of the Virginia Museum of Fine Art Fellowship as well as a Washing State Arts award. His work has been discussed in The New Yorker, NY Arts Magazine, and The Seattle Times, and he has exhibited nationally. Saul currently lives near Seattle, Washington. For more information, see Saul’s website: www.saulbecker.com

Artist's Statement

I am a painter, printmaker, and sculptor obsessed with landscape. My work delves deeply into the story of the evolving American landscape. In my painting I strive to unearth and explore the tension, entropy, and strangeness that I find in the land: I hone an acute disquiet that portrays the landscape as eerily strong and resilient, but never heroic. My work often comes from an expedition process and has led me to explore industrial Brooklyn, 500 million year old shale deposits in Newfoundland, the glaciers of Svalbard, and the blackberry brambles of my backyard in Seattle, Washington.

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